# Lockdown: Losing track of time? Here's how to live in 'real time'

A couple of days after closing, Mondays have started to look a lot like Sundays, and Tuesdays like Fridays and Thursdays, well ... you got it. Suddenly, weekends and weekdays seem like meaningless human constructions and time, just an illusion. The thing is, when you stay up until 4 a.m. (not realizing it's 4 a.m.) you start to wonder why dinners can't be breakfasts, and vice versa. So why is this happening and how do we stop it?

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BE AWARE OF YOUR BODY WATCH

According to the US National Sleep Foundation. In the USA, sleep is regulated by two body systems: sleep/wake homeostasis and the circadian biological clock, which responds to light and dark signals. Just like the time change can negatively affect sleep patterns, due to sudden change in time zones and light signals, keeping odd hours during closing time, not following a schedule and too much time indoors, it can also affect body clock as well as sleep.

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HERE HOW TO FIX IT

CREATE A ROUTINE: ‘Sit down with a calendar and a calendar to make a plan. Keep in mind points such as how many hours you work, exercise, and spend time with the family, as well as what time you are eating and sleeping to keep order, says Dr. Kavita. iStock-1013355986_new

DO NOT OVER WORK, SLEEP OR

OVERBINGE: ‘ Avoid overworking, falling asleep, or binge-eating overtime. Set alarms

on your phone to remind you when to finish work or have lunch/dinner. Take little breaks, ”says Shyam Sundar, a life coach from Bangalore.

TAKE A BREAK FROM TECHNOLOGY: Taking a break from smartphones/social media will give you time to introspect and design a productive day, and it will also prevent you from staying up late and disrupting your sleep pattern, says Dr. Kavita.

PLAN SPECIAL WEEKENDS : Having fun activities to wait can help you distinguish your Monday from your Sunday.

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